The Saloon

Needs more cowboy.

12 notes

littlewiggy:

Hey, remember that time someone thought it would be a good idea to make an animated children’s show about Sherlock Holmes being brought back to life in the future and then impart a robot with the memories of Watson and have them help Detective Lestrade’s great great great (however many greats) grand daughter solve crimes?

IT WAS THE BEST IDEA

Filed under 22ndC i miss the sherlockians we had some laughs remember when someone (me) thought it would be a good idea to rewrite the whole thing better? yeah me neither

1,986 notes

'Cause I was worried sick! You just go out, don't tell anyone where you're going. No contact for days. Jem thinks she knows where you might be and she tells me, So I put on me jacket, I grab a torch and go up into the woods and I get there, I get to the cave. And there you are. You're sitting down, you're leaning on a rock. And I think “Thank God, he's OK, he's OK”. But then I get close. I see Swiss army knife i'd got you for your birthday and it's… You're covered in blood So much blood. I take you in my arms and I run with you in my arms. I run and run and run but it's… I can't because you're…

(Source: lehnshrer, via dont-psychoanalyze-me)

Filed under literally the worst thing i've ever watched such a phenomenal show in the flesh

92,861 notes

littlewiggy:

gunslingerannie:

starling-girl:

littlewiggy:

starling-girl:

littlewiggy:

l0kasenna:

gryffindorgeek7777:

mad-piper-with-a-box:

thetomska:

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

It’s great that he’s addressed this but are we really supposed to believe that NO ONE during the extremely lengthy processes of writing a song, recording it, mastering it and animating the music video wouldn’t have brought it up?

Excuse me but how the hell is spastic even remotely insulting?

So I just recently learned that in the UK calling someone spastic means the same thing as calling someone retarded, only much worse.
If it makes people in the UK feel any better, people in the US literally do not know this (like literally no one I have ever met and/or know). Here being spastic is usually meant to mean something along the lines of acting like a hyper-active child (like running around in circles yelling just because they feel like it please be quiet for just 2 minutes type of child). NOBODY here uses it as a slur.
Since Weird Al is a US musician and the US music industry is pretty non-international, yeah actually I think its entirely possible that none of the people who worked on this song actually knew that spastic was considered an awful slur in some parts of the world.
And I’m like 99.9999% sure that Weird Al is genuinely very sorry that he was accidentally offensive.

Yeah in the UK spastic isn’t even a ‘oh people on the internet hate that word’ sort of thing, you got fucking bollocked in high school for using it.
You can kinda get away with calling someone a ‘spaz’ that usually means someone being hyperactive/bouncy/overstimulated, but it does come from spastic so still not recommended that you use it in public.
I didn’t know it was primarily a UK thing tho!

Okay, UK friends, accuracy of this assessment?

Spastic is never something I was allowed to get away with saying, though much to my regret I went through a phase of using it anyway when I was younger until I learned better.
I believe it was originally used to describe something with cerebral palsy, and then started to be used in an offensive way, associated with general stupidity and ineptness.
This study (BBC, somewhat informal) showed it to be the second most offensive word associated with disability in the UK, though the majority of the voters were not disabled (only 18.3% disabled voters).
I still hear people using the word ‘spaz’, but they’re generally hushed up pretty quickly.

This is super interesting. I know that there are obviously certain vocabulary differences between American English and UK English, but I would NOT have known about this one. I think, oddly, we use it in the same way, just there isn’t an association with a particular disability. The connotation just isn’t there in the US. 
I think it’s sort of similar to the way that some curse words are seen as more or less offensive depending on if you are in the US vs UK. Like, I know that most people in the US consider “cunt” to be extremely offensive. 
(also thanks gunslingerannie for replying earlier)

Oh god, same over here though. Once I told my mother that a girl at school had called me a cunt, and she literally hit me and told me never to say that word out loud, ever. I think that one’s pretty universal.

I find the way that “cunt” has become so offensive (but definitely more so in the US) very interesting given its proliferation in Victorian erotica where it’s used as roughly analogous to “cock” in terms of filthiness, especially given that “cock”, while crude, isn’t exactly offensive nowadays.

Oh definitely. I’m trying to think of other offensive words that lose something between cultures. Hmmmm, maybe fanny? I don’t know why it’s bothering me so much that there is such a difference in connotation with “spastic.”

I HAVE A MASSIVE PROBLEM WITH “FANNY” omfg like all those middle-aged mums going “SIT DOWN ON YER FANNIES” and i’m like OMG NO also “fanny pack”.Also, the word “butt”. Like, parents in the US seem to use it with their kids SO MUCH but over here it’s seen as crude and “bum” would be preferable.

littlewiggy:

gunslingerannie:

starling-girl:

littlewiggy:

starling-girl:

littlewiggy:

l0kasenna:

gryffindorgeek7777:

mad-piper-with-a-box:

thetomska:

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

It’s great that he’s addressed this but are we really supposed to believe that NO ONE during the extremely lengthy processes of writing a song, recording it, mastering it and animating the music video wouldn’t have brought it up?

Excuse me but how the hell is spastic even remotely insulting?

So I just recently learned that in the UK calling someone spastic means the same thing as calling someone retarded, only much worse.

If it makes people in the UK feel any better, people in the US literally do not know this (like literally no one I have ever met and/or know). Here being spastic is usually meant to mean something along the lines of acting like a hyper-active child (like running around in circles yelling just because they feel like it please be quiet for just 2 minutes type of child). NOBODY here uses it as a slur.

Since Weird Al is a US musician and the US music industry is pretty non-international, yeah actually I think its entirely possible that none of the people who worked on this song actually knew that spastic was considered an awful slur in some parts of the world.

And I’m like 99.9999% sure that Weird Al is genuinely very sorry that he was accidentally offensive.

Yeah in the UK spastic isn’t even a ‘oh people on the internet hate that word’ sort of thing, you got fucking bollocked in high school for using it.

You can kinda get away with calling someone a ‘spaz’ that usually means someone being hyperactive/bouncy/overstimulated, but it does come from spastic so still not recommended that you use it in public.

I didn’t know it was primarily a UK thing tho!

Okay, UK friends, accuracy of this assessment?

Spastic is never something I was allowed to get away with saying, though much to my regret I went through a phase of using it anyway when I was younger until I learned better.

I believe it was originally used to describe something with cerebral palsy, and then started to be used in an offensive way, associated with general stupidity and ineptness.

This study (BBC, somewhat informal) showed it to be the second most offensive word associated with disability in the UK, though the majority of the voters were not disabled (only 18.3% disabled voters).

I still hear people using the word ‘spaz’, but they’re generally hushed up pretty quickly.

This is super interesting. I know that there are obviously certain vocabulary differences between American English and UK English, but I would NOT have known about this one. I think, oddly, we use it in the same way, just there isn’t an association with a particular disability. The connotation just isn’t there in the US. 

I think it’s sort of similar to the way that some curse words are seen as more or less offensive depending on if you are in the US vs UK. Like, I know that most people in the US consider “cunt” to be extremely offensive. 

(also thanks gunslingerannie for replying earlier)

Oh god, same over here though. Once I told my mother that a girl at school had called me a cunt, and she literally hit me and told me never to say that word out loud, ever. I think that one’s pretty universal.

I find the way that “cunt” has become so offensive (but definitely more so in the US) very interesting given its proliferation in Victorian erotica where it’s used as roughly analogous to “cock” in terms of filthiness, especially given that “cock”, while crude, isn’t exactly offensive nowadays.

Oh definitely. I’m trying to think of other offensive words that lose something between cultures. Hmmmm, maybe fanny? I don’t know why it’s bothering me so much that there is such a difference in connotation with “spastic.”

I HAVE A MASSIVE PROBLEM WITH “FANNY” omfg like all those middle-aged mums going “SIT DOWN ON YER FANNIES” and i’m like OMG NO also “fanny pack”.

Also, the word “butt”. Like, parents in the US seem to use it with their kids SO MUCH but over here it’s seen as crude and “bum” would be preferable.

92,861 notes

starling-girl:

littlewiggy:

starling-girl:

littlewiggy:

l0kasenna:

gryffindorgeek7777:

mad-piper-with-a-box:

thetomska:

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

It’s great that he’s addressed this but are we really supposed to believe that NO ONE during the extremely lengthy processes of writing a song, recording it, mastering it and animating the music video wouldn’t have brought it up?

Excuse me but how the hell is spastic even remotely insulting?

So I just recently learned that in the UK calling someone spastic means the same thing as calling someone retarded, only much worse.
If it makes people in the UK feel any better, people in the US literally do not know this (like literally no one I have ever met and/or know). Here being spastic is usually meant to mean something along the lines of acting like a hyper-active child (like running around in circles yelling just because they feel like it please be quiet for just 2 minutes type of child). NOBODY here uses it as a slur.
Since Weird Al is a US musician and the US music industry is pretty non-international, yeah actually I think its entirely possible that none of the people who worked on this song actually knew that spastic was considered an awful slur in some parts of the world.
And I’m like 99.9999% sure that Weird Al is genuinely very sorry that he was accidentally offensive.

Yeah in the UK spastic isn’t even a ‘oh people on the internet hate that word’ sort of thing, you got fucking bollocked in high school for using it.
You can kinda get away with calling someone a ‘spaz’ that usually means someone being hyperactive/bouncy/overstimulated, but it does come from spastic so still not recommended that you use it in public.
I didn’t know it was primarily a UK thing tho!

Okay, UK friends, accuracy of this assessment?

Spastic is never something I was allowed to get away with saying, though much to my regret I went through a phase of using it anyway when I was younger until I learned better.
I believe it was originally used to describe something with cerebral palsy, and then started to be used in an offensive way, associated with general stupidity and ineptness.
This study (BBC, somewhat informal) showed it to be the second most offensive word associated with disability in the UK, though the majority of the voters were not disabled (only 18.3% disabled voters).
I still hear people using the word ‘spaz’, but they’re generally hushed up pretty quickly.

This is super interesting. I know that there are obviously certain vocabulary differences between American English and UK English, but I would NOT have known about this one. I think, oddly, we use it in the same way, just there isn’t an association with a particular disability. The connotation just isn’t there in the US. 
I think it’s sort of similar to the way that some curse words are seen as more or less offensive depending on if you are in the US vs UK. Like, I know that most people in the US consider “cunt” to be extremely offensive. 
(also thanks gunslingerannie for replying earlier)

Oh god, same over here though. Once I told my mother that a girl at school had called me a cunt, and she literally hit me and told me never to say that word out loud, ever. I think that one’s pretty universal.

I find the way that “cunt” has become so offensive (but definitely more so in the US) very interesting given its proliferation in Victorian erotica where it’s used as roughly analogous to “cock” in terms of filthiness, especially given that “cock”, while crude, isn’t exactly offensive nowadays.

starling-girl:

littlewiggy:

starling-girl:

littlewiggy:

l0kasenna:

gryffindorgeek7777:

mad-piper-with-a-box:

thetomska:

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

It’s great that he’s addressed this but are we really supposed to believe that NO ONE during the extremely lengthy processes of writing a song, recording it, mastering it and animating the music video wouldn’t have brought it up?

Excuse me but how the hell is spastic even remotely insulting?

So I just recently learned that in the UK calling someone spastic means the same thing as calling someone retarded, only much worse.

If it makes people in the UK feel any better, people in the US literally do not know this (like literally no one I have ever met and/or know). Here being spastic is usually meant to mean something along the lines of acting like a hyper-active child (like running around in circles yelling just because they feel like it please be quiet for just 2 minutes type of child). NOBODY here uses it as a slur.

Since Weird Al is a US musician and the US music industry is pretty non-international, yeah actually I think its entirely possible that none of the people who worked on this song actually knew that spastic was considered an awful slur in some parts of the world.

And I’m like 99.9999% sure that Weird Al is genuinely very sorry that he was accidentally offensive.

Yeah in the UK spastic isn’t even a ‘oh people on the internet hate that word’ sort of thing, you got fucking bollocked in high school for using it.

You can kinda get away with calling someone a ‘spaz’ that usually means someone being hyperactive/bouncy/overstimulated, but it does come from spastic so still not recommended that you use it in public.

I didn’t know it was primarily a UK thing tho!

Okay, UK friends, accuracy of this assessment?

Spastic is never something I was allowed to get away with saying, though much to my regret I went through a phase of using it anyway when I was younger until I learned better.

I believe it was originally used to describe something with cerebral palsy, and then started to be used in an offensive way, associated with general stupidity and ineptness.

This study (BBC, somewhat informal) showed it to be the second most offensive word associated with disability in the UK, though the majority of the voters were not disabled (only 18.3% disabled voters).

I still hear people using the word ‘spaz’, but they’re generally hushed up pretty quickly.

This is super interesting. I know that there are obviously certain vocabulary differences between American English and UK English, but I would NOT have known about this one. I think, oddly, we use it in the same way, just there isn’t an association with a particular disability. The connotation just isn’t there in the US. 

I think it’s sort of similar to the way that some curse words are seen as more or less offensive depending on if you are in the US vs UK. Like, I know that most people in the US consider “cunt” to be extremely offensive. 

(also thanks gunslingerannie for replying earlier)

Oh god, same over here though. Once I told my mother that a girl at school had called me a cunt, and she literally hit me and told me never to say that word out loud, ever. I think that one’s pretty universal.

I find the way that “cunt” has become so offensive (but definitely more so in the US) very interesting given its proliferation in Victorian erotica where it’s used as roughly analogous to “cock” in terms of filthiness, especially given that “cock”, while crude, isn’t exactly offensive nowadays.

0 notes

"Let me in," the soldier cried, / "for I’ll not go back again-o."
"Feck off," replied the demoman, and blew him up with a sticky-bomb.

Found this hilarious doodle while emptying out my art supply drawer. Cold Haily Windy Night is a Steeleye Span track based on Roud #135, Let Me In This Ae Night from that usual suspect, Robbie Burns. Naturally, I always hear “soldier” with a capital S. The lower right panel is a reference to the fact that the sort of soldiers who sneak into ladies’ chambers in folk songs are inevitably already married.
I thought this was hysterical when I drew it. Unfortunately the number of people in the intersection of folk music and TF2 is very small so literally no-one got the joke. Hence why this never got inked.

"Let me in," the soldier cried, / "for I’ll not go back again-o."

"Feck off," replied the demoman, and blew him up with a sticky-bomb.

Found this hilarious doodle while emptying out my art supply drawer. Cold Haily Windy Night is a Steeleye Span track based on Roud #135, Let Me In This Ae Night from that usual suspect, Robbie Burns. Naturally, I always hear “soldier” with a capital S. The lower right panel is a reference to the fact that the sort of soldiers who sneak into ladies’ chambers in folk songs are inevitably already married.

I thought this was hysterical when I drew it. Unfortunately the number of people in the intersection of folk music and TF2 is very small so literally no-one got the joke. Hence why this never got inked.

Filed under tf2 annie is an unrepentant folkie

92,861 notes

littlewiggy:

l0kasenna:

gryffindorgeek7777:

mad-piper-with-a-box:

thetomska:

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

It’s great that he’s addressed this but are we really supposed to believe that NO ONE during the extremely lengthy processes of writing a song, recording it, mastering it and animating the music video wouldn’t have brought it up?

Excuse me but how the hell is spastic even remotely insulting?

So I just recently learned that in the UK calling someone spastic means the same thing as calling someone retarded, only much worse.
If it makes people in the UK feel any better, people in the US literally do not know this (like literally no one I have ever met and/or know). Here being spastic is usually meant to mean something along the lines of acting like a hyper-active child (like running around in circles yelling just because they feel like it please be quiet for just 2 minutes type of child). NOBODY here uses it as a slur.
Since Weird Al is a US musician and the US music industry is pretty non-international, yeah actually I think its entirely possible that none of the people who worked on this song actually knew that spastic was considered an awful slur in some parts of the world.
And I’m like 99.9999% sure that Weird Al is genuinely very sorry that he was accidentally offensive.

Yeah in the UK spastic isn’t even a ‘oh people on the internet hate that word’ sort of thing, you got fucking bollocked in high school for using it.
You can kinda get away with calling someone a ‘spaz’ that usually means someone being hyperactive/bouncy/overstimulated, but it does come from spastic so still not recommended that you use it in public.
I didn’t know it was primarily a UK thing tho!

Okay, UK friends, accuracy of this assessment?

Speaking as a teacher, I would certainly bollock someone in my class for using it in anything other than a medical context. I would also agree that it is worse than “retard”, which is in turn worse than “div” (which I didn’t think people still used until I had to tell off some year 7s for it). It’s not a word that you hear often, and I’m always really shocked when Americans use it without any apparent thought.
The fact that the charity Scope used to be called the Spastics Society and changed their name in 1994 because of the fact that the word had become a slur says a lot.

littlewiggy:

l0kasenna:

gryffindorgeek7777:

mad-piper-with-a-box:

thetomska:

giddytf2:

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

And that is just one reason why I love Weird Al.

It’s great that he’s addressed this but are we really supposed to believe that NO ONE during the extremely lengthy processes of writing a song, recording it, mastering it and animating the music video wouldn’t have brought it up?

Excuse me but how the hell is spastic even remotely insulting?

So I just recently learned that in the UK calling someone spastic means the same thing as calling someone retarded, only much worse.

If it makes people in the UK feel any better, people in the US literally do not know this (like literally no one I have ever met and/or know). Here being spastic is usually meant to mean something along the lines of acting like a hyper-active child (like running around in circles yelling just because they feel like it please be quiet for just 2 minutes type of child). NOBODY here uses it as a slur.

Since Weird Al is a US musician and the US music industry is pretty non-international, yeah actually I think its entirely possible that none of the people who worked on this song actually knew that spastic was considered an awful slur in some parts of the world.

And I’m like 99.9999% sure that Weird Al is genuinely very sorry that he was accidentally offensive.

Yeah in the UK spastic isn’t even a ‘oh people on the internet hate that word’ sort of thing, you got fucking bollocked in high school for using it.

You can kinda get away with calling someone a ‘spaz’ that usually means someone being hyperactive/bouncy/overstimulated, but it does come from spastic so still not recommended that you use it in public.

I didn’t know it was primarily a UK thing tho!

Okay, UK friends, accuracy of this assessment?

Speaking as a teacher, I would certainly bollock someone in my class for using it in anything other than a medical context. I would also agree that it is worse than “retard”, which is in turn worse than “div” (which I didn’t think people still used until I had to tell off some year 7s for it). It’s not a word that you hear often, and I’m always really shocked when Americans use it without any apparent thought.

The fact that the charity Scope used to be called the Spastics Society and changed their name in 1994 because of the fact that the word had become a slur says a lot.

2 notes

I don’t know if you guys have ever seen my BLU Medic cosplay from like three years back but I just found the gloves which are certified chemical gloves and by God they will probably survive the nuclear apocalypse.

I don’t know if you guys have ever seen my BLU Medic cosplay from like three years back but I just found the gloves which are certified chemical gloves and by God they will probably survive the nuclear apocalypse.

Filed under annie tidies her room